Benefits for Patients

Photographer Dave Tuepah www.freeimages.com

Photographer Dave Tuepah www.freeimages.com

One of the most noticeable impacts for students of the Alexander Technique is an improvement in the ability to do large motor tasks with greater ease and accuracy. By teaching people how to observe and change the entire movement task by using Primary Control they can learn or relearn movement tasks in a way that lets them adapt to their current specific set of mechanical limitations. The result is more efficient movement with less wasted effort and energy.

As patients are better able to reason what movements are required to complete tasks and how to use Primary Control to achieve that goal, balance and timing improve. With greater accuracy comes motor planning and adjustment that more closely matches the environment and needs of the movement task. By definition, integration of sensory data with motor planning is coordination and its improvement is a natural consequence of the Alexander Technique.

Patients who move in a manner that places less mechanical strain on their body and improves their overall coordination and use of the correct body part in tasks means there will be less injury to the body and swifter recovery. Such a result translates to less medical intervention. Even more useful is that patients learn how to examine and change movements during a recurrence of symptoms. They can therefore actively self-treat early. Research shows that back pain patients who receive Alexander Technique lessons along with other therapy interventions not only report better results but improvement is still maintained one year later. This is in direct contrast to interventions that do not include Alexander Technique training.